“Wesak” Seela Program for children

Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

“Wesak” Seela Program for children

Cancellation NOTICE

The “Wesal Seela” Program for Children, which was scheduled on May 03rd 2020, has been cancelled due to recent Coronavirus pandemic as the British government directing on social distancing measures.

we regret any inconvenience this may cause you if nay
and appreciate your understanding. 

3 May, 2020 @ 9:00 am 1:00 pm

The most important Buddhist festival is known as either Vesak, Wesak or Buddha Day, and is celebrated annually on the full moon of the ancient lunar month of Vesakha, which usually falls in May.

At Vesak Buddhists commemorate the birth of the Buddha-to-be, Siddhattha Gotama, his Enlightenment at the age of 35 when he became the Buddha and his final ‘passing’ into Nirvana at the age of 80, no more to be reborn. Buddhist scriptures relate that each of these three significant events occurred on a full moon of the Indian lunar month of Vesakha.

Traditionally, his birth is supposed to have been in 623 BC but the Buddhist calendar is counted from his final passing, eighty years later. The older tradition of Vesak is to celebrate all three events but there are some more recent Buddhist schools and groups that celebrate just the birth and others only the Enlightenment.

In Buddhism, death is not the end of life; it teaches rebirth and differentiates it from reincarnation because Buddhism does not recognise a self or soul that is continually reappearing in a new form. Death for the unenlightened, whose minds are still infected with desire, is followed by yet another life. But for the Enlightened who have extinguished all desire, including the desire to be born again, there is no more rebirth. So Buddhists don’t usually refer to the Buddha’s death but to his passing, into Nibbana or Nirvana.

Only by passing into Nirvana can a person end the cycle of death and re-birth.

‘The Buddha’ is not a personal name but a title, and can be translated as ‘the Enlightened One’ or ‘the One Who Knows’. He was not born the Buddha but became the Buddha through his realisation of full and perfect Enlightenment. This state is also known as Nirvana (Sanskrit)or Nibbana (Pali) and occurs when a person sees and understands the true nature of all things.

As a result, all their greed, hatred and delusion is extinguished, which in turn means that there will be no more re-birth. The Buddha achieved the state of nirvana and this is celebrated on Vesak.

There are some cultural and local differences in how the various Buddhist groups and nations celebrate Vesak, but broadly speaking devout Buddhists will try to attend their local temple for at least part of the day, while some remain there throughout the day and night of the full moon. The celebration will include the practices of Giving, Virtue and Cultivation and the doing of good and meritorious deeds.

Giving usually involves bringing food to offer and share, as well as supplies for the temple and symbolic offerings for the shrine. Virtue is observed by reaffirming commitment to moral precepts. Cultivation can include chanting, meditation and listening to sermons.

from: https://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/buddhism/holydays/wesak.shtml

Leicester Buddhist Vihara

+44 116 282 5003

Leicester Buddhist Vihara

9 Una Ave, Braunstone Town
Leicester, leicestershire LE3 2GS United Kingdom
+ Google Map
0116 282 5003
https://www.leicesterbuddhistvihara.co.uk